The Maltese Falcons

Ladies and Gentlemen Aviators

75 years ago, Malta was both the most bombed place on Earth and the stage for the greatest aerial battle since the Battle of Britain, with airmen arriving from all over the British Commonwealth. In the Battle of Britain, Canadians made up only 4% of the fighter pilots, but at Malta, that number had risen to 25% and Canadians made up an even higher percentage of the aces. Follow this link to learn more

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Lower than a Snake’s Belly in a Wagon Rut Redux

Ladies and Gentlemen Aviators

Every once in a while we reprise an old story from years past. Five years ago this story circled to globe and is still travelling. It was by a long margin our most read story of the nearly 500 we’ve published. Recently we’ve added dozens of new images for your enjoyment. Click here to view this incredible collection of the boldest low flying since before the Second World War.

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In Search of Lost Virtues

It’s the end of 2015. Time for reflection and soul-searching. In a world of increasing danger and social change, perhaps lessons from our veterans of the Second World War can help guide us to a better time. Follow this link to learn more

In Search of Lost Values

Frederick Forsythe’s The Shepherd

In Canada, it has become a Christmas tradition for nearly forty years to listen to a recording of on Christmas Eve. For the past six years, it has been our tradition to tell people of this remarkable story and lead them to the radio play. It is a story that can be listened to a hundred times. Follow this link to learn more:

Frederick Forsythe's The Shepherd

A Northern Light

 

Day or night, the Canadian North holds forth in natural spectacle—a unique and story-telling backdrop for an aviation photographer like Stephen Fochuk. Follow this link to see some of his images of bush flying in and around Yellowknife, Northwest Territories:

Read the story

A Northern Light

 

Ghost in the House

With another Remembrance Day upon us, it is not only our moral duty to remember the sacrifices of our men and women in uniform, but also to rediscover those who are long forgotten. To bring them to life again. To share their stories with younger generations. To make good on our promises. Here is the story of one young father in Ottawa who imbued in his children a sense of duty and history by connecting them with A Ghost in the House. Follow this link to learn more:

 

A Ghost in the House

Personal Effects

These days, we call it closure, but in 1942, Gertrude Rouleau simply wanted her lost son’s personal effects and the memories they contained. Though it took more than three years to hunt them down, the RCAF was finally able to bring them to her door. Follow this link to learn more: Click Here

 

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